U.K. Coronavirus Strain Does Not Lead To More Severe Illness And Death, Study Finds – NPR

Hospital employees tend to a Covid-19 patient at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth, England, last month. Scientists have found that the so-called U.K. version of the coronavirus isnt most likely to lead to death or severe illness.

Adrian Dennis/AFP via Getty Images

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Adrian Dennis/AFP through Getty Images

Hospital employees tend to a Covid-19 client at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Portsmouth, England, last month. Scientists have actually found that the so-called U.K. variation of the coronavirus isnt more most likely to cause death or serious illness.

Adrian Dennis/AFP by means of Getty Images

People infected with the U.K. variation of the coronavirus didnt experience more extreme signs and werent more most likely to die from this specific pressure, according to a new research study of hospitalized patients released Monday. The strain, called the B. 1.1.7 variant, remains more infectious than initial pressures of the virus nevertheless, according to the research study in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. It is now the most common strain in the U.S. Researchers for The Lancet research study collected samples from clients at the University College London Hospital and the North Middlesex University Hospital in between Nov. 9 to Dec 20, 2020.

Clients who tested favorable for the B. 1.1.7 version also reportedly had higher “viral loads,” or higher quantities of the virus in their bodies.

Individuals contaminated with the U.K. variation of the coronavirus didnt experience more extreme symptoms and werent more likely to pass away from this particular strain, according to a new study of hospitalized clients published Monday. The pressure, called the B. 1.1.7 alternative, stays more contagious than original stress of the virus however, according to the research study in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The U.K. strain is believed to have first emerged in England in September 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is now the most common stress in the U.S. Researchers for The Lancet research study gathered samples from patients at the University College London Hospital and the North Middlesex University Hospital in between Nov. 9 to Dec 20, 2020. The samples were gathered simply prior to a surge in hospitalizations in England and Ireland due to the rapid spread of this specific pressure of the coronavirus. Researchers sequenced samples from 341 patients and discovered 58 percent were favorable for the B. 1.1.7 variation. The other 42 percent were contaminated with a various strain, according to the research study. Researchers compared the seriousness of symptoms in between the two groups and found those with the B. 1.1.7 pressure were not particularly even worse off than those with other infection variants.

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