Tracking COVID-19 in Alaska: 3 deaths and 589 cases reported Monday – Anchorage Daily News

Were making this crucial details about the pandemic offered without a membership as a public service. We depend on reader assistance to do this work. Please consider joining others in supporting independent journalism in Alaska for simply $3.23 a week. Alaska reported 3 new deaths associated with COVID-19 and 589 new cases on Monday. Case counts have actually spiked in the previous month, consistently setting daily records. Health officials nationwide anticipated to see an uptick in infections in the weeks after the Thanksgiving vacation, when lots of Americans might have gathered or traveled. The climbing case numbers have actually translated to a boost in both deaths and hospitalizations. The deaths of two Anchorage residents and one Seward citizen were reported Monday. Other information about the deaths were not instantly readily available. In overall, 145 Alaskans and one nonresident with COVID-19 have actually died considering that the pandemic began here in March, according to the Department of Health and Human Services COVID-19 control panel. Alaskas total death rate per capita is among the most affordable in the country, but state officials say its hard to compare Alaska to other states since of its vast geography and susceptible healthcare system. By Monday, 151 people with COVID-19 were hospitalized and another 15 people in healthcare facilities were thought to be contaminated with the virus. Twenty-four people with COVID-19 were on ventilators and 45 extensive care system beds were available across the state. COVID-19 clients represented about 15% of the states entire hospitalizations. In Anchorage, where the sickest patients often wind up, there were 18 intensive care unit beds open, an increase from Sunday, when just 10 beds were available. More than 75% of non-intensive inpatient beds were filled in the city Monday, with 105 remaining readily available out of 523. State health authorities have repeatedly expressed concern that limited healthcare facility staffing in Alaska could also posture problems as the infection continues to spread. Issue over staffing and health center capability led Anchorage Acting Mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson to impose a monthlong “hunker down” that started recently. The emergency situation order locations restrictions on restaurants and bars, limiting them to takeout or delivery. Of the 557 cases reported in Alaska locals Monday, 222 remained in Anchorage, 12 in Chugiak and 42 in Eagle River; four were in Homer, 10 in Kenai, two in Nikiski, 6 in Soldotna and 3 in Sterling; 38 remained in Kodiak; 2 remained in Valdez; 35 remained in Fairbanks and seven in North Pole; five remained in Delta Junction; 2 remained in Big Lake, 26 in Palmer, 87 in Wasilla and one in Willow; 2 were in Nome; 3 remained in Utqiagvik; one remained in Haines; two were in Juneau; one was in Sitka; one remained in Wrangell; and 16 remained in Bethel. One case was classified by the state as unidentified. Among neighborhoods smaller sized than 1,000 individuals not called to safeguard personal privacy, there was one case in the northern portion of the Kenai Peninsula Borough and 3 in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area; one in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area; one in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough; one in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area; one in the Aleutians East Borough, 7 in the Bethel Census Area and 11 in the Kusilvak Census Area. On Monday, 32 nonresidents tested positive for COVID-19 in Alaska, consisting of: one in Anchorage, one in Fairbanks, one in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, one in Wasilla, one in Juneau and 20 in Unalaska. The state categorized 7 of the cases as unknown. While people may get tested more than when, each case reported by the state health department represents just one person. When they were tested, it is not clear how numerous of the people who tested favorable for the infection Monday were revealing symptoms. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates about a third of individuals with coronavirus infections are asymptomatic. State health authorities continue to ask Alaskans to avoid indoor gatherings with non-household members and report that most Alaskans who contract the infection get it from a buddy, household member or coworker. There was a 6.5% test positivity rate over the last 7 days. Health officials have actually alerted that a positivity rate above 5% suggests widespread community transmission. More than 280,000 Americans had actually passed away of COVID-19 by Monday, the CDC reported. There have actually been more than 14 million reported infections.

Alaskas general death rate per capita is one of the lowest in the nation, but state authorities state its hard to compare Alaska to other states because of its large location and susceptible health care system. Of the 557 cases reported in Alaska locals Monday, 222 were in Anchorage, 12 in Chugiak and 42 in Eagle River; 4 were in Homer, 10 in Kenai, 2 in Nikiski, 6 in Soldotna and three in Sterling; 38 were in Kodiak; two were in Valdez; 35 were in Fairbanks and 7 in North Pole; 5 were in Delta Junction; two were in Big Lake, 26 in Palmer, 87 in Wasilla and one in Willow; 2 were in Nome; three were in Utqiagvik; one was in Haines; two were in Juneau; one was in Sitka; one was in Wrangell; and 16 were in Bethel. Among communities smaller sized than 1,000 people not called to protect personal privacy, there was one case in the northern portion of the Kenai Peninsula Borough and three in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area; one in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area; one in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough; one in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area; one in the Aleutians East Borough, seven in the Bethel Census Area and 11 in the Kusilvak Census Area. On Monday, 32 nonresidents checked positive for COVID-19 in Alaska, including: one in Anchorage, one in Fairbanks, one in the Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, one in Wasilla, one in Juneau and 20 in Unalaska. While people might get evaluated more than once, each case reported by the state health department represents just one individual.

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