The Feds Are Making PrEP Free. But You May Still Have To Pay To Get It – NPR

Truvada, one of the medications licensed for PREPARATION, recently went generic. PREPARATION is now required to be covered by insurance providers.

Jeff Chiu/AP

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Truvada, one of the medications authorized for PrEP, recently went generic. PrEP is now needed to be covered by insurance coverage service providers.

Jeff Chiu/AP

“We do not have universal health insurance coverage in the United States,” Krellenstein said. “So the real obstacle today, the next obstacle in prep access, is going to determine what policies the CDC and the Department of Health and Human Services can put into location to make sure that those people can likewise access PrEP as quickly as people with insurance.” The CDC informs NPR it is dealing with “numerous fronts” to ensure access to PrEP– consisting of “focused financing to assist provide” the treatment to those who require it the most.Listen to Krellensteins full Morning Edition interview. This story initially appeared on the Morning Edition live blog.

Its called PrEP, a once-daily pill that is 99% efficient at avoiding HIV infections. PREPARATION has actually been around for almost a decade, and health officials have long advocated for high threat individuals to take it, however usage has been restricted due to the costs. Truvada, one of the medications licensed for PrEP, just recently went generic, but utilized to cost upwards of $1,800 a month. The CDC informs NPR it is working on “several fronts” to make sure access to PrEP– consisting of “focused financing to assist provide” the treatment to those who require it the most.Listen to Krellensteins full Morning Edition interview.

PrEP has actually been around for nearly a years, and health authorities have actually long advocated for high threat individuals to take it, however use has been limited due to the expenses. Truvada, one of the medications authorized for PrEP, just recently went generic, but used to cost upwards of $1,800 a month.

Krellenstein says for those who have medical insurance, this eliminates a major barrier to getting on PrEP. But for those without insurance coverage, concerns stay.

“You need to go to the physician basically 4 times a year, at least per CDC guidelines, and get a checkup to ensure that you dont have HIV and that whatever else kind of appearances OK,” James Krellenstein of the advocacy group PrEP4All told NPRs Steve Inskeep. “A lot of health insurance wouldnt cover it. Individuals would be stuck [paying for] laboratory costs and clinic visits.” Recent federal guidance says health insurance companies must cover all of the expenses for the treatment, consisting of the medication, medical professionals visits, and lab tests.

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