Starbucks drops COVID vaccine mandate after Supreme Court ruling

Starbucks is no longer needing its U.S. employees to be immunized against COVID-19, reversing a policy it revealed previously this month, saying it was reacting to last weeks ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

David Zalubowski/AP file picture

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David Zalubowski/AP file photo

Starbucks is no longer requiring its U.S. employees to be immunized versus COVID-19, reversing a policy it revealed earlier this month, stating it was reacting to last weeks ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

David Zalubowski/AP file image

Starbucks is no longer requiring its U.S. workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, reversing a strategy it revealed previously this month.In a memo sent Tuesday to workers, the Seattle coffee giant stated it was reacting to last weeks judgment by the U.S. Supreme Court. In a 6-3 vote, the court rejected the Biden administrations strategy to require vaccines or regular COVID screening at companies with more than 100 workers.”We appreciate the courts ruling and will comply,” Starbucks Chief Operating Officer John Culver composed in the memo.

Starbucks is no longer needing its U.S. employees to be immunized versus COVID-19, reversing a strategy it announced earlier this month.In a memo sent out Tuesday to staff members, the Seattle coffee giant said it was responding to last weeks judgment by the U.S. Supreme Court. GE, which uses 56,000 people in the U.S., had at first called for employees to get totally vaccinated no later on than Feb. 11. Citigroup Inc., one of the largest U.S. banks, revealed in October that workers needed to be immunized or get a lodging by Jan. 14. The Dearborn, Mich.-based business, which has 3,000 U.S. workers, informed staff members in an email last Friday that the Supreme Court choice would not affect its own required, which went into result this month. A November study of more than 500 U.S. business by the consulting company Willis Towers Watson revealed that extremely couple of employers with vaccination requirements– 3%– had actually seen a spike in resignations.

Citigroup Inc., one of the largest U.S. banks, revealed in October that employees required to be vaccinated or receive a lodging by Jan. 14. The Dearborn, Mich.-based company, which has 3,000 U.S. workers, told staff members in an e-mail last Friday that the Supreme Court choice wouldnt affect its own required, which went into effect this month. A November study of more than 500 U.S. companies by the consulting company Willis Towers Watson showed that really few employers with vaccination requirements– 3%– had actually seen a spike in resignations.

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