New studies suggest dairy may actually be GOOD for us… and even help prevent disease – Daily Mail

In the case of dairy, its definitely true that several studies observing big groups of individuals have failed to find a clear association in between higher levels of dairy usage and increased heart health risks.There is a theory that this is since the other aspects in dairy, such as calcium and specific fatty acids, work together in what is understood as the dairy matrix to protect our cardiovascular health.Scientists have actually not yet been able to establish how this might work. This implies studies are open to bias, he says.This is why, in spite of a growing number of research studies tossing doubt over the link between dairy and health problems, the NHS, the British Heart Foundation and the Governments Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition say their advice on dairy is not changing.Under current recommendations adults and older kids are encouraged to eat dairy in small amounts, pick low-fat options where possible and prevent excessive intake of butter or cheese.That suggests no more than two to 3 portions of dairy a day, with each portion equivalent to a third of a pint of milk, a little matchbox-sized piece of cheese or a small pot of yoghurt. Hard cheeses such as Cheddar are one of the greatest sources of salt in our diet plan and the sugar that is added to dairy products such as yoghurts, both entire milk and low-fat varieties, milkshakes and ice cream make dairy products a top source of totally free sugars in the UK diet, says Victoria Taylor.But if we decide for foods without added salt or sugar, could the advantages of dairy nutrients outweigh the damage from fats? They likewise suggest minimising the consumption of high-fat dairy products for all women.One suggestion is that the calcium, vitamin D and conjugated linoleic acid (a type of omega-6 fatty acid) in dairy affect cell growth and can prevent tumour development.Dairy may be particularly advantageous for securing versus hormone receptor-positive kinds of breast cancer since its components can down-regulate oestrogen receptor activity, state the researchers.With fermented dairy, the benefits may derive from probiotics or excellent bacteria it contains, which have been shown to protect versus cancer by stabilizing bacteria in the gut (in turn affecting the bodys immune response, helping secure it from disease). The researchers say the association between dairy intake and breast cancer risk is stronger in premenopausal ladies, potentially owing to more robust interactions between the various parts in dairy in younger women.Commenting on the study, Professor Kefah Mokbel, a breast surgeon at the personal Princess Grace Hospital in London, said: The assumption that dairy items contain substantial amounts of oestrogens and growth hormones has actually led to the extensive belief that dairy products increase the danger of hormone-sensitive breast cancer.

In the case of dairy, its definitely true that several studies observing big groups of people have actually failed to find a clear association between greater levels of dairy consumption and increased heart health risks.There is a theory that this is due to the fact that the other elements in dairy, such as calcium and particular fatty acids, work together in what is known as the dairy matrix to safeguard our cardiovascular health.Scientists have not yet been able to establish how this may work. This implies studies are open to predisposition, he says.This is why, despite a growing number of studies tossing doubt over the link between dairy and health problems, the NHS, the British Heart Foundation and the Governments Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition state their suggestions on dairy is not changing.Under existing recommendations adults and older children are encouraged to eat dairy in moderation, select low-fat alternatives where possible and prevent excessive intake of butter or cheese.That means no more than two to three parts of dairy a day, with each portion equivalent to a third of a pint of milk, a little matchbox-sized piece of cheese or a little pot of yoghurt. The researchers state the association between dairy consumption and breast cancer risk is stronger in premenopausal women, potentially owing to more robust interactions between the different parts in dairy in more youthful women.Commenting on the research study, Professor Kefah Mokbel, a breast cosmetic surgeon at the personal Princess Grace Hospital in London, said: The assumption that dairy items include considerable quantities of oestrogens and growth hormones has led to the prevalent belief that dairy items increase the risk of hormone-sensitive breast cancer.

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