New Research Shows High Vitamin D Levels May Protect Against COVID-19, Especially for Black People – SciTechDaily

The research study, released today (March 19, 2021) in JAMA Open Network, retrospectively took a look at the relationship between vitamin D levels and probability of screening favorable for COVID-19. The study looked at information from over 3,000 clients at UChicago Medicine who had had their vitamin D levels tested within 14 days before a COVID-19 test.

The research team is now hiring individuals for two separate medical trials testing the efficacy of vitamin D supplements for avoiding COVID-19.
This research is a growth of an earlier research study revealing that a vitamin D deficiency (less than 20 ng/ml) might raise the threat of testing positive for COVID-19. In the existing study, those outcomes were further supported, discovering that people with a vitamin D deficiency had a 7.2% chance of screening favorable for the virus. A separate study recently discovered that over 80% of patients detected with COVID-19 were vitamin D deficient.
” These new outcomes inform us that having vitamin D levels above those generally considered adequate is connected with reduced threat of screening positive for COVID-19, at least in Black individuals,” stated David Meltzer, MD, PhD, Chief of Hospital Medicine at UChicago Medicine and lead author of the research study. “This supports arguments for designing clinical trials that can evaluate whether or not vitamin D may be a viable intervention to decrease the threat of the illness, especially personallies of color.”

Food rich in vitamin D.
In a retrospective study of individuals tested for COVID-19, vitamin D levels above those generally considered enough were associated with a lower risk of COVID-19.
A new research study at the University of Chicago Medicine has actually discovered that when it comes to COVID-19, having vitamin D levels above those traditionally considered adequate might reduce the risk of infection, particularly for Black individuals.
The research study, published today (March 19, 2021) in JAMA Open Network, retrospectively examined the relationship in between vitamin D levels and probability of screening positive for COVID-19. The study looked at information from over 3,000 clients at UChicago Medicine who had actually had their vitamin D levels tested within 14 days before a COVID-19 test.

” Theres a lot of literature on vitamin D. Most of it has actually been focused on bone health, which is where the present standards for adequate vitamin D levels come from,” Meltzer described. Meltzer kept in mind that most people, particularly people with darker skin, have lower levels of vitamin D; roughly half of the worlds population has levels below 30ng/ml. “We can see that theres an association in between vitamin D levels and likelihood of a COVID-19 diagnosis, however we do not know precisely why that is, or whether these results are due to the vitamin D straight or other related biological factors.”

Meltzer was influenced to examine this subject after seeing an article in early 2020 that discovered individuals with vitamin D deficiency who had randomly been designated to receive vitamin D supplements had much lower rates of viral breathing infections compared to those who did not receive supplementation. He decided to examine information being collected at UChicago Medicine on COVID-19 to determine the role that vitamin D levels may be playing.
” Theres a lot of literature on vitamin D. Most of it has been focused on bone health, which is where the existing requirements for sufficient vitamin D levels originate from,” Meltzer described. “But theres likewise some evidence that vitamin D might improve immune function and decrease inflammation. So far, the data has been relatively inconclusive. Based upon these outcomes, we think that earlier studies may have offered dosages that were too low to have much of an effect on the immune system, even if they sufficed for bone health. It may be that different levels of vitamin D are adequate for different functions.”
Vitamin D can be obtained through diet plan or supplements, or produced by the body in response to direct exposure of the skin to sunshine. Meltzer noted that many individuals, especially individuals with darker skin, have lower levels of vitamin D; roughly half of the worlds population has levels below 30ng/ml. “Lifeguards, web surfers, those are the kinds of folks who tend to have more than sufficient vitamin D levels,” he said. “Most folks living in Chicago in the winter are going to have levels that are well below that.”
While vitamin D supplements are reasonably safe to take, extreme intake of vitamin D supplements is associated with hypercalcemia, a condition in which calcium develops up in the blood stream and causes nausea, throwing up, weakness, and regular urination. It can even more lead to bone pain and kidney stones if left untreated.
” Currently, the adult suggested dietary allowance for vitamin D is 600 to 800 international units (IUs) each day,” said Meltzer. “The National Academy of Medicine has stated that taking up to 4,000 IUs per day is safe for the huge majority of people, and risk of hypercalcemia increases at levels over 10,000 IUs per day.”
Among the obstacles of this study is that it is presently hard to identify precisely how vitamin D might be supporting immune function. “This is an observational research study,” stated Meltzer. “We can see that theres an association in between vitamin D levels and likelihood of a COVID-19 medical diagnosis, however we dont know exactly why that is, or whether these outcomes are because of the vitamin D directly or other associated biological aspects.”
Triggered by the proof that people with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to test positive for COVID-19 and experience considerable signs, a team at the University of Chicago and Rush University is carrying out two research studies to learn whether taking a day-to-day vitamin D supplement can help avoid COVID-19 or reduce the seriousness of its symptoms.
Individuals who would like to find out more about the study and identify their eligibility can go to https://chess.uchicago.edu/vitamind/.
Referral: “Association of Vitamin D Levels, Race/Ethnicity, and Clinical Characteristics with COVID-19 Test Results” by Thomas J. Best, Hui Zhang, Tamara Vokes, Vineet M. Arora and Julian Solway, 19 March 2021, JAMA Network Open.DOI: 10.1001/ jamanetworkopen/2021.4117.

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