Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954 – WGN TV Chicago

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LAKE COUNTY, Ill.– A senior north rural male has actually passed away from rabies– the first human case in Illinois since 1954.

The rabies infection contaminates the main anxious system, eventually triggering illness in the brain and death. Without preventive treatment, rabies is normally fatal.

One month later on, officials stated the male began experiencing symptoms constant with rabies– consisting of neck discomfort, headache, difficulty controlling his arms, finger numbness and trouble speaking.

Health officials urged the guy to start post-exposure rabies treatment, due the its high mortality rate, however the man declined.

If you find yourself in close distance to a bat and are uncertain if you were exposed, do not release the bat as it must be properly captured for rabies screening. Call your doctor or regional health department to help figure out if you might have been exposed and call animal control to remove the bat.

In mid-August, a Lake County guy in his 80s woke up with a bat on his neck. The species was gathered and consequently evaluated positive for rabies.

” Rabies has the greatest death rate of any illness,” stated IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for individuals who rapidly seek care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you believe you may have been exposed to rabies, right away look for medical attention and follow the suggestions of healthcare suppliers and public health authorities.”

So far this year, 30 bats have checked positive for rabies in Illinois.

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” Rabies has the greatest mortality rate of any disease,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for people who rapidly look for care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you believe you might have been exposed to rabies, immediately seek medical attention and follow the suggestions of health care providers and public health officials.”

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