Flu Season Could Make Coronavirus Testing Delays Even Worse – The New York Times

Numerous of these tests utilize similar devices and chemicals, and need handling and processing by trained personnel.Whats more, lots of influenza and R.S.V. tests disappeared from the market this spring as the companies that make them rapidly rotated to resolve the coronavirus.Late summer is generally when laboratories start stockpiling influenza tests, R.S.V. tests, and flu-R.S.V. combination tests in anticipation of the fall rise, said Susan Butler-Wu, clinical microbiology lab director with the University of Southern Californias Keck School of Medicine, whose laboratory purchases thousands of these tests every winter season. And while coronavirus testing in the United States has actually mainly been comped, federal financing sources like the CARES Act havent explicitly dealt with the issue of combo diagnostics, leaving uncertain how much clients might have to pay.Cheaper options do exist, including some that can screen patient samples for only the most likely microbial culprits.California-based Cepheid, which got emergency situation approval for a coronavirus-only test previously this year, is putting the last touches on a new test for four pathogens– 2 types of flu, R.S.V. and the coronavirus– which will deliver results in about half an hour. The combo test was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and cleared for use by the F.D.A. in July.The C.D.C.s test is an advantage for performance, stated William Glover, assistant director of contagious diseases at North Carolinas state public health laboratory.

Several of these tests utilize comparable machines and chemicals, and require handling and processing by trained personnel.Whats more, many flu and R.S.V. tests vanished from the market this spring as the business that make them quickly rotated to resolve the coronavirus.Late summertime is typically when laboratories begin stockpiling influenza tests, R.S.V. tests, and flu-R.S.V. combo tests in anticipation of the autumn rise, stated Susan Butler-Wu, scientific microbiology laboratory director with the University of Southern Californias Keck School of Medicine, whose lab purchases thousands of these tests every winter season.” A couple of test producers are attempting to maximize performance by establishing tests that can spot a number of pathogens at once. And while coronavirus screening in the United States has largely been comped, federal funding sources like the CARES Act havent explicitly attended to the problem of combination diagnostics, leaving ambiguous how much patients might have to pay.Cheaper alternatives do exist, including some that can screen patient samples for just the most likely microbial culprits.California-based Cepheid, which received emergency approval for a coronavirus-only test earlier this year, is putting the last touches on a new test for 4 pathogens– 2 types of influenza, R.S.V. and the coronavirus– which will provide outcomes in about half an hour. The combination test was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and cleared for use by the F.D.A. in July.The C.D.C.s test is a boon for efficiency, said William Glover, assistant director of contagious illness at North Carolinas state public health lab. That might make it simpler for huge testing companies like Quest Diagnostics to make an exclusive combo panel, which is in the works, according to a company representative.Still, many labs do not have the time or resources to play with new tests, and the DIY versions often end up being more labor-intensive than their market equivalents, said Jennifer Dien Bard, director of the scientific microbiology and virology lab at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles.Preparing for this years influenza season has actually become an onerous process of layering contingency strategies atop contingency strategies, Dr. Babady said.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *