Exclusive: The Chinese Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work – Yahoo News

For the next two hours, Zhang was cocooned from the world at 35,000 feet, but Holmes post on the website Virological.org sent shockwaves through the global clinical community.By the time Zhang touched down in Beijing, his discovery was heading news. To lots of observers, it seemed that furious officials rushing to snuff out proof of the break out were punishing Zhang just for sharing the SARS-CoV-2 genome– and in the on the other hand, slowing down the release of this key information.Yet Zhang denies reports in Western media that his lab suffered any prolonged closure, and rather states it was working furiously during the early days of the break out. “From late January to April, we screened more than 30,000 viral samples,” says Fan Wu, a researcher who helped Zhang with the very first SARS-CoV-2 sequencing.And, in reality, Zhang insists he initially submitted the genome to the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) on Jan. 5– an assertion substantiated by the submission date noted on the U.S government institutions Genbank.

For the next two hours, Zhang was cocooned from the world at 35,000 feet, but Holmes post on the website Virological.org sent out shockwaves through the international clinical community.By the time Zhang touched down in Beijing, his discovery was headline news. To lots of observers, it appeared that furious authorities scrambling to snuff out proof of the break out were penalizing Zhang just for sharing the SARS-CoV-2 genome– and in the on the other hand, slowing down the release of this essential information.Yet Zhang rejects reports in Western media that his laboratory suffered any prolonged closure, and rather states it was working intensely during the early days of the outbreak. “From late January to April, we screened more than 30,000 viral samples,” states Fan Wu, a scientist who assisted Zhang with the first SARS-CoV-2 sequencing.And, in reality, Zhang insists he initially published the genome to the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) on Jan. 5– an assertion corroborated by the submission date noted on the U.S government organizations Genbank. “Its not a good thing for China and the U.S. to be included in this struggle,” says Zhang. Zhang attributes this to Chinas diverse ecology and huge population.

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