Diabetes Myths – Blood Sugar and Testing Explained – Prevention.com

Even if youre one of the more than 34 million individuals with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, theres so much confusing details out there that whats fact and whats gotten oversimplified or distorted isnt rather clear. And because diabetes dramatically increases your threat of cardiovascular problems such as heart disease and stroke, taking it seriously might save your life.

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If youre at threat, your best bet is to decrease your overall calorie intake and get those calories from nutrient-rich foods like non-starchy vegetables, entire grains, and low-fat protein and dairy, says Christine Lee, M.D., of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. And when you have a hankering for a sweet, focus on foods with naturally occurring sugar.Myth # 2 You can only get type 1 diabetes as a kid.Theres a factor type 1 diabetes isnt called juvenile diabetes any longer– you can get it at any age, states Petersen. The two types of diabetes have different causes: In type 1 diabetes, “the body assaults the pancreatic beta cells by mistake, causing them to stop making insulin,” the hormonal agent that lowers glucose in the blood, states Dr. Pinney.

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Myth # 5 The only factor diabetes docs inform patients to exercise is so theyll lose weight.Nope! While it may help people lose weight, workout (even if you dont drop pounds) also increases your insulin level of sensitivity, which naturally reduces your blood sugar. Research studies have actually shown that a single bout of exercise can enhance insulin level of sensitivity by up to 50% for as long as 72 hours after the sweat session. And even if your weight stays exactly the same, exercise can decrease your A1C (long-term glucose levels) and your odds of developing diabetes. Thats because when muscle cells are active, theyre able to use up glucose and use it for energy without requiring any insulin, says Petersen. “Exercise is sort of a wonder treatment in its own method.” This post originally appeared in the May 2020 issue of Prevention.Support from readers like you helps us do our finest work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE presents. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness recommendations.

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Myth # 3 If you have type 2 diabetes, you need insulin.Most people do not– lots of are able to manage their diabetes through diet plan and exercise, oral medication, or a mix of both. Of those with type 2 diabetes, just 40% use insulin, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An estimated 24% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed, which is why physicians recommend that those with major risk elements– such as being 45 or older, being obese, or having a family history of diabetes– have their A1C tested occasionally.

And when you have a hankering for a sweet, focus on foods with naturally taking place sugar.Myth # 2 You can just get type 1 diabetes as a kid.Theres a factor type 1 diabetes isnt called juvenile diabetes anymore– you can get it at any age, states Petersen. The 2 types of diabetes have various causes: In type 1 diabetes, “the body assaults the pancreatic beta cells by mistake, causing them to stop making insulin,” the hormone that reduces glucose in the blood, says Dr. Pinney. Misconception # 3 If you have type 2 diabetes, you need insulin.Most people dont– lots of are able to control their diabetes through diet and workout, oral medication, or a mix of both. Of those with type 2 diabetes, just 40% usage insulin, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An estimated 24% of individuals with diabetes are undiagnosed, which is why physicians advise that those with significant risk factors– such as being 45 or older, being overweight, or having a household history of diabetes– have their A1C evaluated occasionally.

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