COVID SCIENCE-Virus does not threaten US blood supply; … – Thomson Reuters Foundation

By Nancy Lapid June 2 (Reuters) – The following is a roundup of a few of the current clinical studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to discover treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness triggered by the virus. Coronavirus does not threaten U.S. blood supply Current guidelines for screening U.S. blood donors for symptoms of COVID-19 and for a history of recent infections are effectively safeguarding the blood supply from contamination with the new coronavirus, researchers say. In a research study performed for the National Institutes of Health, researchers checked nearly 18,000 “minipools” of blood samples– that is, blood samples pooled from total of approximately 258,000 donors from throughout the nation. Only 3 minipools consisted of genetic product from the virus, according to a report published in the journal Transfusion. In all three, the viral levels were low. In the one minipool that might be tested for infectivity, the virus product was noninfectious, the scientists stated. “Other studies have actually shown that in rare cases where a blood sample tested positive, transmission by blood transfusion has not happened,” coauthor Sonia Bakkour of the University of California, San Francisco, stated in a statement. “Therefore, it appears safe to receive blood as a transfusion recipient and to keep donating blood, without worry of transferring COVID-19 as long as present screenings are used.” (https://bit.ly/3iblpG9) High vitamin D levels do not secure versus COVID-19 Low levels of vitamin D have actually been tied to greater risks for COVID-19 and more extreme health problem, although no research studies have actually shown that vitamin D deficiency is really to blame. A study released on Tuesday in PLoS Medicine suggests that boosting vitamin D levels with supplements would not assist. Scientist studied more than 1.2 million people of European ancestry from 11 nations, a few of whom had genetic versions that result in naturally higher levels of vitamin D. People with these variants did not have a lower threat for coronavirus infection, hospitalization, or serious COVID-19, the scientists reported. Their outcomes suggest that boosting vitamin D levels in deficient individuals most likely would not assist fight the coronavirus, and they do not believe randomized trials evaluating vitamin D supplementation would be rewarding. Other specialists, nevertheless, would still like to see such trials, especially in people of Other and african non-European ancestries. (https://bit.ly/3g62hqA) Immune system workaround helps blood cancer patients with COVID-19 In blood cancer clients who lack antibody-producing cells, other immune cells can compensate to help battle the coronavirus, new research study programs. People with blood cancers– such as leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma – often do not have antibody-making immune cells called B cells, especially after treatment with certain medications. Without sufficient B cells and antibodies, they are at threat for severe COVID-19. However other immune cells, called T cells, discover to assault the virus and recognize, according to a report released in Nature Medicine. Blood cancer patients in the study were more likely to die from COVID-19 than patients with solid growths or without cancer. However among the blood cancer clients, those with greater levels of CD8 T cells were more than 3 times most likely to survive than those with lower levels of CD8 T cells. If they do not have normal antibody reactions, the authors hypothesize that CD8 T cell responses to COVID-19 vaccines may secure blood cancer patients even. “This work can help us encourage patients while we wait on more vaccine specific research studies,” stated co-author Dr. Erin Bange of the University of Pennsylvania in a statement. While clients vaccine action “likely will not be as robust as their friends/family who dont have blood cancers, it is still … possibly lifesaving,” Bange included. (https://go.nature.com/2STOVWf) In some long COVID cases, air gets caught in lungs Some COVID-19 survivors with consistent breathing symptoms have actually a condition called “air trapping,” in which breathed in air gets stuck in the little airways of the lung and can not be breathed out. Scientist studied 100 COVID-19 survivors who were still having breathing issues, like coughs and shortness of breath, an average of more than 2 months after their medical diagnosis. Overall, 33 had actually been hospitalized, consisting of 16 who required extensive care. The amount of lung location revealing so-called ground-glass opacities on imaging studies– a normal sign of lung damage from COVID-19– was greater in the hospitalized group than in those with milder illness, and it was even greater in clients who had actually required extensive care. COVID-19 intensity made little distinction in the typical portion of lung affected by air trapping. It was 25.4% in patients not hospitalized, 34.5% in those who were hospitalized without intensive care, and 27.2% in clients who had actually been critically ill. By contrast, that percentage was 7.3% in a group of healthy volunteers. The air trapping was mainly restricted to clients narrowest airway passages, according to a report published on Saturday on medRxiv ahead of peer review. “The long-lasting repercussions” of these clients little air passages illness “are not understood,” the authors stated. (https://bit.ly/3pcekXo) Open https://tmsnrt.rs/3c7R3Bl in an external web browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines in advancement. (Reporting by Nancy Lapid; Editing by Bill Berkrot).

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Coronavirus does not threaten U.S. blood supply Current standards for screening U.S. blood donors for signs of COVID-19 and for a history of recent infections are effectively safeguarding the blood supply from contamination with the brand-new coronavirus, scientists state. In a study carried out for the National Institutes of Health, researchers checked nearly 18,000 “minipools” of blood samples– that is, blood samples pooled from total of roughly 258,000 donors from across the country. “Other studies have actually shown that in uncommon cases where a blood sample tested positive, transmission by blood transfusion has not occurred,” coauthor Sonia Bakkour of the University of California, San Francisco, said in a declaration. (https://bit.ly/3g62hqA) Immune system workaround helps blood cancer patients with COVID-19 In blood cancer clients who lack antibody-producing cells, other immune cells can compensate to help fight the coronavirus, new research study programs. Blood cancer patients in the research study were more likely to pass away from COVID-19 than clients with strong tumors or without cancer.

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