COVID-19 in California: Track cases, vaccinations, delta variant updates and booster shot and testing info – KCRA Sacramento

EILEEN. THANK YOU TO THE VERY LATEST. THE CORONAVIRUS CASES ACRSOS THE STATE RIGHT NOW, CALIFORNIA CONTINUES TO SEE A DPRO IN CASES THE STATE REPORTED 6700 CASES THURSDAY AND YOU CAN SEE THE NUMBER OF NEW DAILY CASES FELL OVER THE PAST MONTH. THERE ARE 4,400 PEOPLE HOSPITALIZED WITH COVID IN THE STATE THAT IS 170 FEWER THAN THE DAY BEFORE THERE ARE MORE THAN 1,800 ICU BEDS AVAILABLE FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED THEM. STAY HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY ABOUT 80% OF ELIGIBLE CALIFORNIA’S HAVE AT LEAST ONE DOSE OF THE VACCINE. OMFR CALIFORNIA A S

COVID-19 in California: Track cases, vaccinations, delta variant updates and booster shot and testing info

As the delta variant of COVID-19 continues to spread across the country, California is ramping up its vaccination efforts to prevent the spread of the virus.The state has mandated that all health care workers, state employees and school staff be vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo regular testing. Booster shots are recommended for some people, too. California has also recommended masks in indoor spaces for everyone, including anyone already vaccinated, based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s identification of areas with substantial and high community transmission. Below you’ll find information on the latest COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, community transmission, breakdowns of vaccination rates and the latest headlines.App users, click here to see all the charts with this story. Latest COVID-19 cases in 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(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19 case and testing numbers).Latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in 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(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state)Community transmission in CaliforniaAs the delta variant spreads across the country, California issued a new recommendation in late July urging residents to mask up indoors to slow the virus’ spread.Below you’ll find the levels of community transmission by county in California. Latest COVID-19 headlines Florida mother calls for support of hospitals after husband dies from COVID-19 | Deanna Gomez is speaking out and calling for more support, staffing and equipment at hospitals in Florida after she says her husband died from COVID-19, in part, because of a lack of supplies. Is it safe to go trick-or-treating this Halloween? Here’s what you should know | CNN Medical Analyst Dr. Leana Wen is explaining how to celebrate Halloween safely, whether your family is fully vaccinated or not. An emergency physician and professor of health policy and management at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, she is also author of a new book, “Lifelines: A Doctor’s Journey in the Fight for Public Health.” And she is the mother of two young children. How to talk to your kids about getting the COVID-19 vaccine | It’s what parents around the country have been waiting for: Pfizer and BioNTech announced Thursday they are asking the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an emergency use authorization for their COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11.Human behavior will determine when the COVID-19 pandemic ends, CDC director says | The U.S. is making headway in its battle against COVID-19 — with infection and hospitalization rates on the decline after a surge fueled by the highly transmissible delta variant. Colorado woman who won’t get vaccinated denied kidney transplant | When a Colorado woman found out her hospital wouldn’t approve her kidney transplant surgery until she got the COVID-19 vaccine, she was left with a difficult decision pitting her health needs against her religious beliefs. Sutter Roseville nurses protest staffing shortages with candlelight vigil | Nurses at Sutter Roseville Medical Center held a candlelight vigil in front of their workplace Thursday night to draw attention to the staffing shortages they say put patients and nurses at risk. COVID-19 misinformation high among Latinos, Hispanics, report shows | For months, local and state governments have been hosting a variation of vaccination events ranging from taking mobile units to rural areas, to drive-thru clinics, weekend fairs, and even cash and incentives to promote the COVID-19 vaccine. But misinformation still plays a role when it comes to getting vaccinated. How to get reimbursed for an at-home COVID-19 test in California | At-home rapid COVID-19 tests have soared in popularity and they’re likely to become more widely available — and potentially cheaper — in the coming months. Still reeling from COVID-19 impacts, Sacramento leaders seek to fill child care shortages | Dozens of child care centers to close in the Sacramento area due to pandemic-related impacts. Now, leaders are trying to find new ways to address the shortage so that parents can have a safe place to take their children as they get back to work. How many vaccines have been administered in California?| MORE | How many doses have been administered by California county, ZIP codeVaccine Tracker: How many people have been vaccinated across the country?Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?Californians can get their COVID-19 shots at community vaccination sites, doctor’s offices, clinics and pharmacies.You can find the state’s latest updates on covid19.ca.gov/vaccines and check the notification tool My Turn for information on eligibility and to schedule appointments. County health department websites are also a great tool for seeing what vaccine options are available. The state also promotes the online tool Vaccine Finder to help in locating a vaccination site near you.Pharmacy vaccine information:CVSRite AidWalgreens Will I need a booster shot?Health officials in California signed off on federal recommendations in September for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine booster shot for certain people.The free booster is recommended for eligible people at least six months after they were vaccinated with the primary two doses of Pfizer’s vaccine.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel recommended that these groups at higher risk for severe COVID-19 get the shot.People 65 and olderPeople living in a long-term care facilityPeople 50-64 with underlying medical conditionsThe CDC said that people at a higher risk for COVID-19 are also eligible to get the booster.People with underlying medical conditionsPeople at higher risk of COVID-19 exposure and transmission due to occupational or institutional settings. This could include people in the “essential workers” category like health care workers, teachers or those working at homeless shelters, jails, day care facilities and grocery stores. The CDC recommends that people ask their health care provider whether getting a booster shot is appropriate for them. Federal health agencies will be evaluating data related to those who received the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines soon.What should I know about the vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from the FDA?Moderna and Pfizer vaccinesHailed as vaccine game-changers for the medical community, health officials say both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are different than any other used for viruses such as the flu, measles or polio.Those COVID-19 vaccines currently approved under emergency use authorization contain what is called messenger RNA, which is being used to create new types of vaccines to protect against infectious diseases.According to the CDC, “to trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein — or even just a piece of a protein — that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”Johnson & Johnson’s vaccineOn Feb. 28, the Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine — the first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the U.S. and is one that “checks nearly all the boxes.”The vaccine, made by Janssen, J&J’s vaccine arm, was said to be safe and effective, and it’s considered flexible. It’s a single dose, and it doesn’t require special storage.The vaccine is authorized for people ages 18 and older.The CDC and the FDA on April 13 said they were investigating several cases of unusual clots that occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination. The clots occurred in veins that drain blood from the brain and occurred together with low platelets. As a result, the agencies recommended a “pause” in vaccinations with J&J’s vaccine so investigators could look into the cases. Health officials said in an update on April 23 they were aware of 15 cases of the unusual clots since the government authorized use of the vaccine and nearly 8 million shots were given. All were women, most of them under 50. Three died, and seven remained hospitalized.The CDC and FDA lifted the pause, deciding that the vaccine’s benefits outweighed the rare risk of blood clots. They said the risk could be handled with warnings to help younger women decide if they should use that shot or an alternative. More questions answered with our Get the Facts on the Vax reportsKCRA 3 has taken viewer questions about the vaccine to health experts. If you have other questions, fill out our survey or send us an email at newstips@kcra.com.Get the Facts on the Vax: Do you have to get multiple doses of the vaccine for it to be effective?Get the Facts on the Vax: When will the J&J vaccine be available for children 12 and up?Get the Facts on the Vax: Will I be charged for a COVID-19 vaccine?Get the Facts on the Vax: Why should I get vaccinated if I already had COVID-19?Get the Facts on the Vax: For how long will the vaccines be effective?Get the Facts on the Vax: Who should still be getting tested for COVID-19?Can COVID-19 vaccines affect my period?So you got the COVID-19 vaccine: 9 common questions answeredQ&A: Dr. Blumberg answers viewer questions about COVID-19 vaccine safetyYour guide to every COVID-19 vaccine questionYour COVID-19 Vaccine Questions: Facebook Live with Dr. Dean Blumberg, chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at UC Davis HealthCOVID-19 Vaccine Questions: Can I test positive after getting the shot? What if I’ve already had COVID? Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in California? Demand for COVID-19 testing in California and across the country has surged as the highly infectious delta variant spreads and proof of a negative test is increasingly being required for travel, admission to entertainment events, job sites and schools.Testing should be free for individuals with few exceptions at COVID-19 testing sites licensed in California. Health insurance companies are supposed to cover the tests for their members, and the government pays for those who are uninsured.You can get a COVID-19 test from any provider at any time and should not pay anything, including a co-pay or payment toward a deductible for getting tested.Click here for what you should know about getting reimbursed if you were charged. Here is where you can search for a testing site by address, city, county or ZIP code in California. For more information on testing, visit here. | MORE | What to know about different kinds of COVID-19 tests How to protect yourself of COVID-19Here is where you find the state’s latest information on COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.There are six ways to protect yourself and family, according to the California Department of Public Health:• Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.• Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.• Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.• Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.• Stay away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.• Follow guidance from public health officials.What are the symptoms of COVID-19? Per the CDC, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:Fever or chillsCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingFatigueMuscle or body achesHeadacheNew loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrheaThis list does not include all possible symptoms. The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:Trouble breathingPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusionInability to wake or stay awakeBluish lips or face Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.Who is most at risk for coronavirus?Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.— This Associated Press contributed to this report.

As the delta variant of COVID-19 continues to spread across the country, California is ramping up its vaccination efforts to prevent the spread of the virus.

The state has mandated that all health care workers, state employees and school staff be vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo regular testing. Booster shots are recommended for some people, too.

California has also recommended masks in indoor spaces for everyone, including anyone already vaccinated, based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s identification of areas with substantial and high community transmission.

Below you’ll find information on the latest COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, community transmission, breakdowns of vaccination rates and the latest headlines.

App users, click here to see all the charts with this story.

Latest COVID-19 cases in California

Case Statistics

(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19 case and testing numbers).

Latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in California

Hospitals

(App users, click here to see the latest COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state)

Community transmission in California

As the delta variant spreads across the country, California issued a new recommendation in late July urging residents to mask up indoors to slow the virus’ spread.

Below you’ll find the levels of community transmission by county in California.

Latest COVID-19 headlines

How many vaccines have been administered in California?

| MORE | How many doses have been administered by California county, ZIP code

Vaccine Tracker: How many people have been vaccinated across the country?

Where can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Californians can get their COVID-19 shots at community vaccination sites, doctor’s offices, clinics and pharmacies.

You can find the state’s latest updates on covid19.ca.gov/vaccines and check the notification tool My Turn for information on eligibility and to schedule appointments. County health department websites are also a great tool for seeing what vaccine options are available. The state also promotes the online tool Vaccine Finder to help in locating a vaccination site near you.

Pharmacy vaccine information:
CVS

Rite Aid

Walgreens

Will I need a booster shot?

Health officials in California signed off on federal recommendations in September for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine booster shot for certain people.

The free booster is recommended for eligible people at least six months after they were vaccinated with the primary two doses of Pfizer’s vaccine.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel recommended that these groups at higher risk for severe COVID-19 get the shot.

  • People 65 and older
  • People living in a long-term care facility
  • People 50-64 with underlying medical conditions

The CDC said that people at a higher risk for COVID-19 are also eligible to get the booster.

  • People with underlying medical conditions
  • People at higher risk of COVID-19 exposure and transmission due to occupational or institutional settings. This could include people in the “essential workers” category like health care workers, teachers or those working at homeless shelters, jails, day care facilities and grocery stores. The CDC recommends that people ask their health care provider whether getting a booster shot is appropriate for them.

Federal health agencies will be evaluating data related to those who received the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines soon.

What should I know about the vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from the FDA?

Moderna and Pfizer vaccines

Hailed as vaccine game-changers for the medical community, health officials say both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are different than any other used for viruses such as the flu, measles or polio.

Those COVID-19 vaccines currently approved under emergency use authorization contain what is called messenger RNA, which is being used to create new types of vaccines to protect against infectious diseases.

According to the CDC, “to trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein — or even just a piece of a protein — that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”

Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine

On Feb. 28, the Food and Drug Administration authorized Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine — the first single-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the U.S. and is one that “checks nearly all the boxes.”

The vaccine, made by Janssen, J&J’s vaccine arm, was said to be safe and effective, and it’s considered flexible. It’s a single dose, and it doesn’t require special storage.

The vaccine is authorized for people ages 18 and older.

The CDC and the FDA on April 13 said they were investigating several cases of unusual clots that occurred 6 to 13 days after vaccination. The clots occurred in veins that drain blood from the brain and occurred together with low platelets.

As a result, the agencies recommended a “pause” in vaccinations with J&J’s vaccine so investigators could look into the cases.

Health officials said in an update on April 23 they were aware of 15 cases of the unusual clots since the government authorized use of the vaccine and nearly 8 million shots were given. All were women, most of them under 50. Three died, and seven remained hospitalized.

The CDC and FDA lifted the pause, deciding that the vaccine’s benefits outweighed the rare risk of blood clots. They said the risk could be handled with warnings to help younger women decide if they should use that shot or an alternative.

More questions answered with our Get the Facts on the Vax reports

KCRA 3 has taken viewer questions about the vaccine to health experts. If you have other questions, fill out our survey or send us an email at newstips@kcra.com.


Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in California?

Demand for COVID-19 testing in California and across the country has surged as the highly infectious delta variant spreads and proof of a negative test is increasingly being required for travel, admission to entertainment events, job sites and schools.

Testing should be free for individuals with few exceptions at COVID-19 testing sites licensed in California. Health insurance companies are supposed to cover the tests for their members, and the government pays for those who are uninsured.

You can get a COVID-19 test from any provider at any time and should not pay anything, including a co-pay or payment toward a deductible for getting tested.

Click here for what you should know about getting reimbursed if you were charged.

Here is where you can search for a testing site by address, city, county or ZIP code in California. For more information on testing, visit here.

| MORE | What to know about different kinds of COVID-19 tests


How to protect yourself of COVID-19

Here is where you find the state’s latest information on COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations.

There are six ways to protect yourself and family, according to the California Department of Public Health:

• Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

• Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

• Cover a cough or sneeze with your sleeve, or disposable tissue. Wash your hands afterward.

• Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.

• Stay away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.

• Follow guidance from public health officials.


What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Per the CDC, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms.

The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Who is most at risk for coronavirus?

Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

— This Associated Press contributed to this report.

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