Boston health officials identify first cases of coronavirus omicron variant – WCVB Boston

Boston public health officials announced Wednesday the identification of the first cases of the omicron coronavirus variant in the city. The Boston Public Health Commission said three young adults, over the age of 18, tested positive for the variant. “None of these individuals were fully vaccinated,” officials said. “All individuals experienced mild disease, and none required hospitalization.”The first case of omicron in Massachusetts was identified earlier this month. Officials said the patient was a Middlesex County woman in her 20s who was fully vaccinated and who had recently traveled out of state.Omicron is classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization as a variant of concern. Early data suggests omicron spreads more easily than other variants but researchers are still working to determine how its severity may compare to earlier strains. More about the known information on the omicron variant is available at the CDC’s website, which can be reached by clicking here.Omicron is identified through genomic sequencing of virus cases. The State Public Health Laboratory, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and several hospital and academic laboratories have all contributed to sequencing efforts in Massachusetts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The sequencing data contributes to the tracking of clusters and patterns of disease spread. The in-state laboratory capacity to sequence variants allows Massachusetts to not have to rely on out-of-state labs.According to the DPH, other public health prevention measures that help stop the spread of COVID-19 variants include getting tested and staying home if you are sick; frequent handwashing or use of hand sanitizer; following masking requirements; and telling your close contacts if you test positive for COVID-19 so they can take appropriate steps.All three COVID-19 vaccines in use in the United States — Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson — have been shown to be highly protective against severe disease resulting in hospitalization or death due to known COVID-19 variants and remain the single best way for people to protect themselves, their loved ones and their community, according to health officials.There are more than 1,000 locations across Massachusetts to get vaccinated or receive a booster shot. The vaccine is free, and no ID or insurance is required for vaccination. Visit vaxfinder.mass.gov for a list of vaccination locations. Click here to learn more about COVID-19 vaccines from state health officials.

Boston public health officials announced Wednesday the identification of the first cases of the omicron coronavirus variant in the city.

The Boston Public Health Commission said three young adults, over the age of 18, tested positive for the variant.

“None of these individuals were fully vaccinated,” officials said. “All individuals experienced mild disease, and none required hospitalization.”

The first case of omicron in Massachusetts was identified earlier this month. Officials said the patient was a Middlesex County woman in her 20s who was fully vaccinated and who had recently traveled out of state.

Omicron is classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization as a variant of concern. Early data suggests omicron spreads more easily than other variants but researchers are still working to determine how its severity may compare to earlier strains.

More about the known information on the omicron variant is available at the CDC’s website, which can be reached by clicking here.

Omicron is identified through genomic sequencing of virus cases.

The State Public Health Laboratory, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and several hospital and academic laboratories have all contributed to sequencing efforts in Massachusetts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The sequencing data contributes to the tracking of clusters and patterns of disease spread. The in-state laboratory capacity to sequence variants allows Massachusetts to not have to rely on out-of-state labs.

According to the DPH, other public health prevention measures that help stop the spread of COVID-19 variants include getting tested and staying home if you are sick; frequent handwashing or use of hand sanitizer; following masking requirements; and telling your close contacts if you test positive for COVID-19 so they can take appropriate steps.

All three COVID-19 vaccines in use in the United States — Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson — have been shown to be highly protective against severe disease resulting in hospitalization or death due to known COVID-19 variants and remain the single best way for people to protect themselves, their loved ones and their community, according to health officials.

There are more than 1,000 locations across Massachusetts to get vaccinated or receive a booster shot. The vaccine is free, and no ID or insurance is required for vaccination. Visit vaxfinder.mass.gov for a list of vaccination locations. Click here to learn more about COVID-19 vaccines from state health officials.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *