Antidepressants in Our Water Make Crayfish Go Buck Wild – Gizmodo

Because SSRIs work to make serotonin more readily available to the brain, testing how SSRI levels in the water impact crayfish was an intriguing question for researchers.To figure out how these medications in the water affect crayfish, scientists recreated a crayfishs natural habitat: a synthetic stream, total with leaves and rocks that had been left in genuine streams for a few weeks. Into some of these streams, they piped an “environmentally practical concentration” of SSRI.G/ O Media might get a commissionAfter 2 weeks of letting the crayfish settle in (and letting some of them soak up that sweet, sweet antidepressant water), scientists carried out a behavioral experiment: they constructed a Y-shaped plexiglass labyrinth, with one branch of the Y filled with chemicals that indicated food and the other filled with chemicals to signal the presence of another crayfish. The antidepressant-exposed crayfish spent many of their time in the Y arm with the food chemicals, not the arm with the indications of the other crayfish, recommending that their aggression levels werent raised as they got braver.

Picture: Bernd Thissen/dpa/AFP (Getty Images) If youve ever taken an SSRI that makes you desire to go out and start living life again, you may be able to relate to crayfish. Since SSRIs work to make serotonin more offered to the brain, testing how SSRI levels in the water affect crayfish was a fascinating question for researchers.To figure out how these medications in the water impact crayfish, researchers recreated a crayfishs natural habitat: an artificial stream, total with leaves and rocks that had been left in genuine streams for a couple of weeks. Into some of these streams, they piped an “ecologically reasonable concentration” of SSRI.G/ O Media may get a commissionAfter two weeks of letting the crayfish settle in (and letting some of them absorb that sweet, sweet antidepressant water), scientists carried out a behavioral experiment: they built a Y-shaped plexiglass labyrinth, with one branch of the Y filled with chemicals that indicated food and the other filled with chemicals to signal the presence of another crayfish. The antidepressant-exposed crayfish invested most of their time in the Y arm with the food chemicals, not the arm with the indications of the other crayfish, recommending that their hostility levels werent raised as they got braver. The drugs might prod them to get out and eat more food– but the world theyre getting in is a lot more dangerous for them than it is for us, full of predators that could take the chance to snack on a crayfish sensation more pushed than typical to leave its shelter.

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